I love taking risks on people. Of all the things you could risk on, people are by far the best risk. God created people with the ability to soar and accomplish great things – but with that comes the ability to crash and burn. Every time you trust someone you risk in some way. Some people are a safe risk; others are a little more extreme.

When it comes to the topic of calling out leadership in someone – I am always inclined to risk. Having leadership influence and using it to raise up other leaders…well there might be nothing better than that! Perhaps this comes from my optimistic bent, wanting to see the best and believe the most in those around me.

Wherever you have leadership influence I would encourage you to use it to raise up another leader. The process of raising someone up is more of an art than a science, but there are a number of basic practices, which will help you train up a new leader.

Here are 4 practices that are essential in raising up new leaders:

  1. Empower with Freedom – If you want someone to learn leadership you have to actually let them experience real weight and pressure. That means giving freedom so that new leaders can make decisions and experience the payoff and cost associated with their role. If you want to raise up a new leader do not simply give someone a title, empower him or her to go and lead. (Click to tweet)
  2. Pour in Confidence – Never underestimate the value of belief and affirmation in the life of a new leader. One of the greatest gifts you can give to someone you are empowering is the gift of belief – the knowledge that you have confidence in their leadership. (Click to tweet) Encouragement and affirmation never grow old, so pour in confidence as you lift up new leaders around you.
  3. Share Insight (not just information) – The information of leadership is pretty well accessible. A good book or podcast is not bad, but the thing new leaders need more than information is helpful insights. Be quick to pause and share experiences and thoughts that have been transformational in your own leadership journey.
  4. Give Margin for Failure – Some of the best learning experiences are when we fall flat on our face and have to get back up again. New leaders are going to make mistakes, so it is important to account for that as you empower them. There is a difference between giving someone meaningful weight to carry and banking everything on them. It is your responsibility when raising up a new leader to create margin for them to fail and learn without fully having to crash and burn.